Andrew Butler STONESTREET (1828-1891)

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LINTON & BIRD Chronicles

Andrew Butler STONESTREET (1828-1891) & Susanna HINES (1823-1897)

page established Spring 2013 laughing

Andrew Butler STONESTREET (March 31,1828 - June 15, 1891) Confederate States of America, 19th Virginia Calvary. Andrew was born in Bath County, Virginia and died in Braxton County, West Virginia

Andrew Butler STONESTREET (1828-1891) & Susanna HINES (1823-1897)

 

The Stonestreet Family History (Terry Louis Linton © 1999) (Linton Research Fund, Inc., Publication © 1999) (printed in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. USA.) (ISBN 100-00856-1512-1)

LINTON & BIRD Chronicles, Volume VIII, Issue 1 Spring © 2013, ISSN 1941-3521

Produced by Legacy 7.5 on July 14, 2013

LINTON & BIRD Chronicles Volume XVIII, Issue 3, Fall © 2023, ISSN 1941-3521

 

Andrew Butler STONESTREET (1828–1891) was the 2nd cousin 3 times removed of Kirk Louis LINTON (1914-1987).  Also, the 9th cousin three times removed of Jeff Augustus " (1893- Gus" BIRD 1954). [i]

Parents

Andrew was born on March 31, 1828, in Bath County, Virginia, he was the son of Thomas William STONESTREET (1790–1858) & Jane TETER (1805–1839).  [ii] Thomas was born on February 26, 1790, in Frederick County, Virginia and died on January 14, 1858, in Braxton County, Virginia. Thomas was the son of Butler Edelen STONESTREET (1755–1826) & Sarah NORTON (1757–1824). Jane was the daughter of Jacob TETER (1769–1850) & Elizabeth HOLDER (1773–1850). Jane was born in 1805 in Randolph, Charlotte County, Virginia and died on August 6, 1839, in Braxton County, Virginia. [iii]

Early Life

By 1850 Andrew was living on Little Otter Creek in Braxton, Braxton County, Virginia

According to the 1850 United States Federal Census, Andrew was listed as a farmer living on his father’s farm which was valued at $500.00. The Head of house  was Thomas Stonestreet age 61; Home in 1850 District 4, Braxton, Virginia; Occupation Farmer; Industry Agriculture; Dwelling Number 657; Family Number    657; Household members: Thomas Stonestreet age 61; Ruthy Stonestreet age 40; Andrew B Stonestreet age 22; Jacob Stonestreet age 20; Charles Stonestreet 16; Jane Stonestreet age 10; Martha E Stonestreet age 9; Samuel H. P. Stonestreet age 7; Malvina Stonestreet age 4; Jemima F. Stonestreet age 2. [iv]

In 1850, Andrew married Susanna HINES (1823–1897) in Braxton County, Virginia. [v]  Susanna was the daughter of Caleb Henry HINES (1794–1854) & Mary RUSSELL (1786–1870). Susanna was born on September 8, 1823, in Braxton County, Virginia. [vi]

Andrew’s father Thomas died in 1858 and according to Braxton County Court Records, Andrew had inhered the “old Stonestreet House”  [vii]

According to the 1860 United States Federal Census: Name Andrew Stonestreet age 32; Birth Year about 1828; Gender Male; Race White; Birthplace Virginia; Home in 1860 Braxton, Virginia; Post Office Braxton; Dwelling Number 185; Family Number 177; Personal Estate Value $50; Household members: Andrew Stonestreet age 32; Susan Stonestreet age 35; Louisa Stonestreet age 7; Stephen Stonestreet age 5; Araminta Stonestreet age 3; Lorenzo D Stonestreet age 4/12. [viii]

Andrew & Susanna had five known children:

  1. Louisa STONESTREET (1853-1921) was born in 1853 in Braxton County, Virginia. In 1871, Louisa married Jacob Ferdinand SMITH (1847–1921) in Braxton County, West Virginia.

Jacob & Louisa had four known children:

Ulysses Lee SMITH (1872–1942); Homer Franklin SMITH 1874–1966); Mary Susan SMITH (1877–?); John Victor SMITH (1881–1971). [ix]

 

ii. William Cecil STONESTREET (1855-1963) was born in 1855 in Braxton County, Virginia and died on January 8, 1963, in Marion, West Virginia, at age 108. [x]

 

 iii.  Samuel Stephen STONESTREET (1855-1929) was born on February 24, 1855, in the  Holly District, Braxton County, Virginia. In 1881, He married Carrie Sindusky HORNER (1863–1952) in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia. Carrie was born in September 1863, in Pomeroy, Meigs County, Ohio. They had a residence in 1880 in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia. Samuel died on  February 8, 1929, in Davison, Braxton County, West Virginia, at age 73. Carrie died on January 10, 1952, in Akron, Summit County, Ohio.

Sanuel & Carrie had eleven known children:

Clarence G. STONESTREET (1882–1949); Ivy L. STONESTREET (1884–?); Grover Butler STONESTREET (1885–1949); William Cecil STONESTREET (1887–1963); Letcher S. STONESTREET (1889–1976); Phratus Corbon STONESTREET (1892–1970); Daniel Golden STONESTREET (1892–1935); Basha STONESTREET (1894–1981); Elsie STONESTREET (1896–?); Susie S. STONESTREET (1898–?); Lera Amanda STONESTREET (1900–?); Gladys D. STONESTREET (1903–?); Una Sarvilla STONESTREET (1904–?); Walter J. Bryan STONESTREET (1907–?). [xi]

According to Hardesty's West Virginia Counties Volume 3 Pg. 139

Samuel Stephen Stonestreet ~ farmer and teacher in Otter district, Braxton county, West Virginia, was born in this county, on Little Birch river, February 24, 1855. His parents are Andrew Butler Stonestreet and Susanna (Hines) Stonestreet. His father was detailed as butcher for "Stonewall" Jackson's army during the civil war, and served through the whole conflict. His mother was left with five little ones whose care and support devolved entirely upon her for those years, a trust she ably filled.

Samuel S. Stonestreet has been teaching for ten years in Braxton and Gilmer counties, some sixty months in all. He is still teaching in connection with his farm labors, and has 162 acres, 15 acres cleared. He served one term of two years, elected in 1879, as county superintendent of schools.

June 28, 1881, at the residence of the bride's father, on Steer creek, this county, were recorded the marriage vows of Samuel S. Stonestreet and Carrie Sindusky Homer. She was born in Meigs county, Ohio, near Pomeroy, September 7, 1863, a daughter of William and Sarah (Booth) Homer, who settled in Braxton county in 1880. Clarence Good, born October 28, 1882, is the only child of Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Stonestreet.

Mr. Stonestreet receives his mail at Shock, Braxton county, West Virginia.

 

iv. Arimenta "Anettie" Caroline STONESTREET (1857-1923) was born on July 25, 1857, in Braxton, County, Virginia. On December 15, 1874, Arimenta married Samuel Fields SANDS   the son of  Samuel SANDS  &  Edith RIFFLE, in Braxton County, West  Virginia. Samuel was born on April 30, 1846, in Ohio. [xii] They had a residence in 1880 in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia. They had a residence in 1910 in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia. They had a residence in 1920 in Gassaway, Braxton County, West Virginia. Anettie died on October  28, 1923 in Braxton County, West Virginia. Samuel died on December 16, 1934, in Gassaway, Braxton County, West Virginia, at age 88.

Anettie & Samuel had fourteen known children:

Nelson Floyd SANDS (1868–1954); Marcellus Cogar SANDS (1871–1937); Marcellus C, SANDS  (1871–1937);  Floretta B. SANDS (1875–1889); Walter Stephen SANDS (1877–1878); Martin Luther SANDS (1880–1945); Clarence C. SANDS (1882–1883); Eda Myrtle SANDS (1883–?); Louisa Blanch SANDS (1886–1980); Victor Dee SANDS (1888–1972); Earnest Fleming SANDS (1890–1891); Warden Pearl SANDS (1892–1954); Golden Clyde SANDS (1895–1912); Oren F. SANDS (1900–1931)  [xiii]

 

v. Lorenzo Dow STONESTREET (1860-1933) was born on January 25, 1860, in Braxton County, Virginia. He had a residence in 1880 in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia. Lorenzo married Rebecca WALDECK (1868-1947) on December 26, 1886, in Gilmer County, West Virginia. Rebecca was born on May 3, 1868, in West Virginia. Lorenzo died on January 11, 1933,  in Gassaway, Braxton County, West Virginia, at age 72. Rebecca died on January 11, 1947, at age 78. [xiv] 

Lorenzo & Rececca three known had children:

Jacob Dorsey STONESTREET (1888–1954); Louisa "Lue" Iramenta STONESTREET (1891–1968); Ruth Audra STONESTREET (1900–1990)

 

vi,  Thomas Jackson STONESTREET Sr., (1863-1940) was born on September 18, 1863, in Braxton County, Virginia. He had a residence in 1880 in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia. Thomas married Hester Isabel GERWIG  (1866-1943) on July 21, 1887, in Braxton  County, West Virginia.  Hester was born on April 5, 1866, in Lincoln, Braxton County, West Virginia.  They had a residence in 1900 in Sandpoint, Markham, North Side, Priest Lake, Priest River Precincts, Kootenai, Idaho.  They had a residence in 1910 in Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai County, Idaho. They had a residence in 1920 in Coeur d Alene Ward 2, Kootenai County, Idaho. They had a residence in 1930 in Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai County, Idaho. They had a residence in 1920 in Coeur d Alene Ward 2, Kootenai County, Idaho. They had a residence in 1910 in Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai County, Idaho. Thomas died on June 12, 1940,  in Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai County, Idah, at age 76. Hester died on February 3, 1943, in Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai, Idaho, at age 76. [xv]

Thomas & Hester had six known children:

Edna M. STONESTREET (1888–?); Mathina "Matthis" B. STONESTREET (1889–1922); Roscoe E. STONESTREET (1893–1964); Thrace STONESTREET (1897–1979) Hirare STONESTREET (1899–?); Thomas Jackson STONESTREET Jr., (1900–1951).

 

Civil War 1861-1865

On June 20, 1863,  West Virginia split from Virginia, was officially admitted as a State to the United States of America.

Andrew B. Stonestreet enlistment as  a  corporal in Company B, in the 19th Virginia Calvary Confederate States of America. [xvi]   The regiment was active between April 11, 1863, and April 15, 1865, disbanded in April 1865. Commanding offer was Colonel William L. Jackson (1825-1890).

Andrew was detailed as butcher for "Stonewall" (should be “Mudwall” [xvii]) Jackson's army during the civil war and served through the whole conflict. His wife was left with five little ones whose care and support devolved entirely upon her for those years, a trust she ably filled. [xviii]

The first Regiment Muster was on April 15, 1865, according to  John Davison Sutton  History of Braxton County and Central West Virginia  Page 181 records the men who served in the unit throughout the war.

Company B, 19th Virginia Cavalry: John S. Sprigg, captain; Reynolds Davis, first lieutenant, killed; James D. Sprigg, second lieutenant; John J. Williams, third lieutenant; James W. Squires, killed, Richard Williams, Hugh Williams, J. E. Williams, Hanson Williams, Granville Wilson, Hiram West fall, Jacob Westfall, George Westfall, James Westfall, William H. Mathews, F. F. Squires, Jehu Carpenter, Stanley Conrad, Benjamin Riffle, Edmund Barker, Johnson Barker, Isaac Barker, Sheldon Knight, Wesley Knight, Francis Knight, Charles Nutter, killed, H. H. McElwain, Mortimer Thayey, Thomas Belknap, Joseph McCray, Perry Heater, Calvin Heater, Elijah Heater, Robert Givens, Isaac Thrasher, Thomas Goff, Wm. L. Perine, Henry Perine, Robert Perine, Samuel Perine, Joseph McMillin, James K. McMillin, James Shrader, Patrick Foley, Mathew Hines, killed, James Heffner, Samuel Given, James K. Baker, Nathan Hutchinson, Hudson D. Knight ,John May, William W. Taylor, died in service, James Lake, Ambrose Tonkin, A. B. Stonestreet, Jesse Smith, John Gardner, killed, James Gardner, killed, Lewis Weese, killed, John I. Tonkin, died. Aggregate 65 men.

The Regiment was latter attached to The Army of the Valley. It was under the command of Lieutenant General Jubal Early's independent command during the Shenandoah Valley Campaigns in the summer and autumn of 1864. The Army of the Valley was the last Confederate unit to invade Northern territory, reaching the outskirts of Washington, D.C. The Army became defunct after its decisive defeat at the Battle of Waynesboro, Virginia, on March 2, 1865.

The 19th engagements in American Civil War were Jones-Imboden Raid;  Expedition to Beverly, Virginia of  June 29 – July 4, 1863;  Battle of Bulltown was a small skirmish fought in Andrew’s own Braxton County, West Virginia, on October 13, 1863; Marling’s Bottom, April 19, 1864;  Battle of Droop Mountain; [xix]

 

Valley Campaigns of 1864:

 

*************************************

Corporal Andrew B. Stonestreet can be documented with taking part in the following battles from surviving Muster Rolls of the 19th Virginia Caverly. [xx]

Battle of Bulltown on October 13, 1863, Braxton County, West Virginia.

Fought October 20, 1863, at Jackson County, West Virginia

Jones-Imboden Raid April 20 - May 26, 1863, Marion County, Virginia

Battle of New Market on May 15 1864

Battle of Piedmont on June 5, 1864;

Battle of Lynchburg on June 17–18, 1864;

Battle of Monocacy on July 9, 1864; .

Battle of Harper's Ferry on July 15. 1864, West Virginia

Battle of Fisher's Hill on Oct 8, 1864, Virginia

Battle of Tom's Brook on Oct 9, 1864, Woodstock, Virginia

Fought on October 25, 1864, in Marion County, West Virginia

Fought on November 10, 1864,  in Marion County, West Virginia

The 19th Virginia Caverly Regiment disbanded in April 1865.

 

*******************************************

 

Virginia 19th Cavalry (Confederate)

According to Fold3

Copyright © 2023 Fold3® by Ancestry. All Rights Reserved.

Andrew B. Stonestreet Muster Rolls

Muster In Date: 11 Apr 1863

Muster Out Date: 15 Apr 1865

Commanders:

Brigadier General Henry B. Davidson

Brigadier General William L. Jackson

Lieutenant Colonel William P. Thompson

Major General Lunsford L. Lomax

Major General Robert Ransom Jr.

 

Battles muster in for.

Cedar Creek  19 Oct 1864 Frederick County, Virginia; Shenandoah County, Virginia; Warren County, Virginia.

Droop Mountain 6 Nov 1863 Pocahontas County, West Virginia

Fort Stevens    11 Jul 1864 District of Columbia, DC

Third Winchester  19 Sep 1864 Frederick County, Virginia; Winchester, Virginia

 

Post War

By 1870, Andrew and his family had relocated  to the adjoining county and perched a farm on Cedar Creek, Townsends Mills, Center, Gilmer County, West Virginia.

According to the 1870 United States Federal Census: Name Andrew B. Stonestreet age in 1870, 41; Birth Date about 1829; Birthplace Virginia; Dwelling Number  165; Home in 1870 Center, Gilmer, West Virginia; Race White; Gender Male; Post Office Townsends Mills; Occupation Farmer; Male Citizen Over 21 Yes; Personal Estate Value $262; Real Estate Value $100; Household members: Andrew B, Stonestreet age 41 Head of House, Farmer; Susanna Stonestreet age 46 wife keeping house; Louisa Stonestreet age 16, daughter; Samuel S, Stonestreet age 15; Armettie Stonestreet age 13; Lorenzo D. Stonestreet age 10; Thomas Stonestreet age 6. [xxi]

By 1880 Andrew and family were living in Otter, Braxton County, West Virginia.

According to the June 1, 1880 United States Federal Census:  Name Andrew B. Stonestreet age 51; Birth Date about 1829; Birthplace Virginia;  Home in 1880 Otter, Braxton, West Virginia; Dwelling Number 235; Race White; Gender Male; Head of House; Marital Status Married, Spouse's Name Susanah Stonestreet; Father's Birthplace Virginia; Mother's Birthplace Virginia; Occupation Farmer;  Household members: Susanah Stonestreet age 56 keeping house; Andrew B. Stonestreet age 51 Farmer; Samuel S. Stonestreet age 25 son, farmer; Loring D. Stonestreet age 20 at home; Thomas J. Stonestreet age 16, son, farmer. [xxii]

Most of the 1890 census materials were destroyed on January 10, 1921, when the Commerce Department building caught fire, and in the subsequent disposal of the remaining damaged records.

Andrew died on June 15, 1891, in Braxton County, and buried in the Hines Cemetery, Braxton County, West Virginia.

Susanna died on  six years laterr on September 20, 1897, in Otter, Braxton County, at age 74 and buried next to her husband in the Hines Cemetery, Braxton County, West Virginia. [xxiii]

 

Editor's Note: most of the  genealogy and linage for this article comes from The Stonestreet Family History and the Civil War Research from Wikipedia and Fold3   . [xxiv]

 

Sources

 

[i]   Terry Louis Linton, The Stonestreet Family History (Linton Research Fund, Inc., Publication © 1999) (printed in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. USA.) (copyright 1999 Terry Louis Linton) (ISBN 100-00856-1512-1)

 

[ii]      West Virginia, Marriages Index,  1785 1971 (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations,  Inc., 2011.Original data   "West Virginia Marriages, 1853–1970." Index.  FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2008, 2009. Digital images of originals housed in County Courthouses in various counties).  .... U.S., Find a Grave® Index, 1600s-information Web address https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/138250885/andrew-b.-stonestreet Publisher Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher date 2012, Publisher location Lehi, UT, USA, Repository Ancestry.com Address http://www.Ancestry.com

 

[iii]   Warren Skidmore, Thomas Stonestreet of Birchden, Withyham, East Sussex and of Charles County, Maryland with His Posterity to the Sixth Generation, Fourth Revised Edition (Published by Heritage Books Inc., 2012, Westminster, Maryland) (Copyright © 1985, 2000 Warren Skidmore) (ISBN 978-07884-1694-1) p 14.

 

[iv]   1850 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by  FamilySearch.Original data   Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the      Bureau of the), Year: 1850; Census Place: District 4, Braxton, Virginia;  Roll: M432_937; Page: 220B; Image:

 

[v]   1850 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data   Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the), Year: 1850; Census Place: District 4, Braxton, Virginia; Roll: M432_937; Page: 220B; Image: .  ....  1860 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data   1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records), Year: 1860; Census Place: , Braxton, Virginia; Roll: ; Page: 370; Image: 378.  .... 1870 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data   1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Record), Year: 1870; Census Place: Center, Gilmer, West Virginia; Roll: M593_; Page: ; Image:

 

[vi]  The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1880  United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints  © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.  All use is subject to the limited), Year: 1880; Census Place: Otter, Braxton, West Virginia; Roll: 1400; Family History Film: 1255400; Page: 459B; Enumeration District: 009;  Image: …..

West Virginia, Deaths Index, 1853-1973 Transcript Birth date: 1822 Birthplace: Death date: 20 Sep 1897 Death place: Centralia, Braxton, West Virginia Publisher Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data - "West Virginia Deaths, 1853–1970." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. From originals housed in county courthouses throughout West Virginia. "Death Records.".O

 

[vii]   John Davison Sutton  History of Braxton County and Central West Virginia copyright January 1919.  Page 132 Sutton’s History, May 9, 1861, Braxton County Court proceeding. This is a reproduction of a library book that was digitized  by Google as part of an ongoing effort to preserve the  information in books and make it universally accessible,

 

[viii]  1860 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by  FamilySearch.Original data   1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA  microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records), Year: 1860; Census Place: , Braxton, Virginia;  Roll: ; Page: 370; Image: 378

 

[ix] 1920 United States Federal Census Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data   Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Reco), Year: 1920; Census Place: Otter, Braxton, West      Virginia; Roll: T625_1949; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 10; Image: 861.

 

[x]  West Virginia, Deaths Index, 1853-1973 Transcript Death date: 8 Jan 1963 Death place: Marion, West Virginia Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. From originals housed in county courthouses throughout West Virginia. "Death Records.".O

 

[xi]   1910 United States Federal Census (Online publication  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication  T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Was), Year: 1910; Census Place: Otter, Braxton, West Virginia; Roll: T624_1677; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0014; Image: FHL microfilm: 1375690.

 

[xii]   West Virginia, Marriages Index,  1785 1971 (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations,  Inc., 2011.Original data   "West Virginia Marriages, 1853–1970." Index.  Family Search, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2008, 2009. Digital images of originals housed in County Courthouses in various counties). 

 

[xiii]  Terry Louis Linton, The Stonestreet Family History (Linton Research Fund, Inc., Publication © 1999) (printed in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. USA.) (copyright 1999 Terry Louis Linton) (ISBN 100-00856-1512-1)

 

[xiv]   West Virginia, Deaths Index, 1853-1973: Transcript Death date: 11 Jan 1933 Death place: Braxton, West Virginia  - "West Virginia Deaths, 1853–1970." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. From originals housed in county courthouses throughout West Virginia. "Death Records.".O

 

[xv] 1910 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data   Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Was), Year: 1910; Census Place: Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai, Idaho; Roll: T624_225; Page: 21A; Enumeration District: 0166; Image: ; FHL microfilm: 1374238.  ....  U.S. City Directories, 1821 1989 (Beta) (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data   Original sources vary according to directory. The title of the specific directory being viewed is listed at the top of the image viewer page. Check the directory title).  .... 1920 United States Federal Census. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data   Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Reco), Year: 1920; Census Place: Coeur d Alene Ward 2, Kootenai, Idaho; Roll: T625_291; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 206; Image: 1013.  .... 1930 United States Federal Census (Online publication   Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.Original data   United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.:      National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626,), Year: 1930; Census Place: Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai, Idaho; Roll: 401; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 11; Image: 53.0; FHL microfilm: 2340136.

 

[xvi]   U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles: Author Historical Data Systems, comp. Publisher Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.Original data - Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA from the following list of works. Copyright 1997-2009 Historical Data Systems, Inc. PO Box 35Duxbury, MA 02331.Ori

 

[xvii]     From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:  Nickname controversy William L. Jackson is one of three Confederate generals associated with the nickname "Mudwall", a reference to the "Stonewall" nickname given to his cousin Thomas. While William Jackson has been known as such for a long time, it was found by noted historian Garry W. Gallagher that the nickname was originally given to fellow Confederate General Alfred E. Jackson from Tennessee (no family relation). It seems the two were mixed up in the Southern Historical Society Papers in 1906 and the error was involuntarily repeated afterwards. Sometimes the name is even attributed to another (likewise not related) Confederate Brigadier, John K. Jackson. It is also possible that at times the name was attributed to several of the Jacksons simultaneously.

 

[xviii]  Hardesty's West Virginia Counties Volume 3, Pg. 139

 

[xix]   Richard L. Armstrong, 19th and 20th  Virginia Cavalry (H.E. Howard, Inc. 1994)

 

[xx]  U.S., American Civil War Regiments, 1861-1866: Author Historical Data Systems, comp; Publisher Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Publisher date 1999 Provo, UT, USA Repository information Ancestry.com Address http://www.Ancestry.com

 

[xxi]   1870 United States Federal Census Images reproduced by  FamilySearch.Original data   1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Record), Year: 1870; Census Place: Lincoln, Braxton, West Virginia; Roll: M593_; Page: ; Image.

 

[xxii]  1880 United States Federal Census: Transcript Birth date: about 1829 Birthplace: Virginia Residence date: 1880 Residence place: Otter, Braxton, West Virginia, United States

Detail Year: 1880; Census Place: Otter, Braxton, West Virginia; Roll: 1400; Family History Film: 1255400; Page: 459B; Enumeration District: 009; Image: .Source information Author

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publisher Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited.

 

[xxiii]  West Virginia, Deaths Index, 1853-1973: Name A. B. Stonestreet; Birth Date about 1828; Death Date 16 Jun 1891; Death Place Braxton, West Virginia; Death Age 63 years 2 months 16 days; Race White; Marital Status Married; Gender Male; FHL Film Number 572705 … U.S., Find a Grave® Index, 1600s-Current Name Andrew B. Stonestreet; Gender  Male; Birth Date 29 Oct 1828; Death Date 15 Jun 1891; Cemetery Hines Cemetery Burial or Cremation Place Braxton, Braxton County, West Virginia, United States of America; Has no Bio; Spouse Susanna Stonestreet; Children           Lorenzo Dow Stonestreet; Samuel Stephen Stonestreet; Irminta Caroline Sands; Louisa Smith.

 

[xxiv]  Terry Louis Linton, The Stonestreet Family History (Linton Research Fund, Inc., Publication © 1999) (printed in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. USA.) (copyright 1999 Terry Louis Linton) (ISBN 100-00856-1512-1)

 

1911 Braxton County, West Virginia Map by Rand McNally Form Wikipidia

Editor’s Note: I am inclined to include this 1933 newspaper article on the Battle of Bulltown that Andrew Butler Stonestreet took part in only a few miles from his farm and his wife and their young family.

 

West Virginia Archives & History

Battle of Bulltown The West Virginia Review June 1933 pp 254-56

The Battle of Bulltown

By Roy Bird Cook

The motorist driving along the present State Route 19, about twelve miles northeast of Sutton, in the county of Braxton, suddenly sweeps up to a hilltop, presenting below a panorama of great beauty. To the northwest along the Little Kanawha River lay the gentle rolling lands marked here and there by a farm house. Below in a grove of native trees sets the home of a "country doctor," sometime teacher of a small boy who in later years, now writes these hurried notes. He is beloved for miles by the people among whom he has spent a long and useful life. To the right around a bend in the road is the little village of Bulltown, today little more than a store, a residence or two, an old covered bridge and the "village blacksmith." Across on the north shore of the Little Kanawha River rises an abrupt plateau on which to this day can be discerned the scars on the surface of the earth made by men who wore the Blue in the days of the Civil War. This little village is famous for two things; one an Indian massacre, a blot on the story of the white pioneers of Western Virginia, and the other the fact that it is the site of the "battle of Bulltown," fought on October 13, 1863.

It is not out of place to mention first the origin of the name, and the initial' episode in which the community figures. Captain Bull, a noted Indian chief lived in Boone County, New York. He was a prime mover in the attempt to alienate the Delaware Indians from their English affiliations. As a result he and some of his tribe were arrested and taken to New York City. In 1768 Captain Bull and four other Indians, with their families, came to Western Virginia and established a little village at the "Salt Licks," at the present location of Bulltown. Here they lived in peace with the whites and engaged in the manufacture and sale of salt. In June, 1772, the family of Adam Stroud that lived on Gauley River was killed by a roving band of Shawnees from the Ohio. Five Indian haters from the settlement at Buckhannon, stole forth and in cold blood killed these peaceful Indians, threw their bodies into the Little Kanawha River and destroyed the village. White men, in time, took up the same location and a new Bulltown arose.

To this point in early days, rode men over primitive trails in quest of salt. Early road orders show when and by whom "trails" were blazed through the forest to this place. Then came the building of the old Weston and Gauley Turnpike, which brought new life to the interior, and occupied a most important place in the military operations in Western Virginia during the Civil War. In 1863, the old road reached out from the Balt[i]more and Ohio Railroad at Clarksburg to the south. Passing through Weston it followed the West Fork of the Monongahela to the village of Jacksonville, at that time a most important spot. It then crossed the divide by way of "Imboden's Mountain" to the waters of Knawls Creek, and thence to Millstone Run. The road reached the Little Kanawha River at the mouth of this stream, at an elevation of seven hundred and seventy-seven feet. Here the road changed sharply to the northwest, followed a narrow bench along the north side and crossed the river by means of a covered bridge, built in 1854. After following the south bank for a short distance, it ascended a hill to an elevation of ten hundred and thirty-seven feet, a little later, passed through Wine Gap, crossed Salt Lick Run through another covered bridge, and went on its way to Sutton and Gauley Bridge.

This road formed a "backway" along the western front of the Confederacy. The junction of Millstone Run with the Little Kanawha created a sharp triangle. The hill to the north rose abruptly about three hundred feet to a bench and back of this to an elevation of eleven hundred feet. The river makes a bend below the site of Bulltown. Two and one-half miles above is located the noted falls of the Little Kanawha and a deserted river channel. Here stood an old mill deriving power from the falls. From the falls across a "neck" it is a mile and one-half to Bulltown. A trail led over this bend from a small stream called Laurel Run. On the south side of the river, the hills rise by a series of terraces to a height of twelve hundred feet. This location was later occupied by the Confederates. The heights to the north were on the farm of Moses Cunningham. It was a very strategic point, as it controlled the road and bridge.

Early in the war the Federals had thrown up breastworks and erected some log cabins. This was called "the fort." Below on the river "bench" stood the village of Bulltown, the location being about twelve miles northeast of Sutton, fifteen miles south of Weston, and eight miles from Jacksonville; all occupied at the time by Federal troops. The town itself embraced several houses, and about one hundred feet above the bridge stood the salt works. The names of Haymond, Byrne, Lorentz, Cozad, Hurley, White, Cunningham, Lockard, McLaughlin, Berry and others, are very prominent in connection with this location about this period.

In 1863, a force of five thousand Confederates crossed the Alleghenies on a raid to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and to try to penetrate to the Ohio River. The north wing was commanded by General William E. Jones and the south wing by General John D. Imboden, whose parents lived on "Imboden Mountain" a few miles from Bulltown. The Federal government, much perturbed at the ease with which General B. S. Roberts, and others permitted this, sent General W. W. Averell to take command of affairs in Western Virginia. He appeared at Weston, assumed command, and late in June drove Colonel (General) William L. Jackson and his command away from Beverly back into the Greenbrier Valley. Federal troops were shifted along the turnpike between Clarksburg and Gauley Bridge. Two companies of the Sixth West Virginia Infantry, and part of the Eleventh West Virginia Infantry, commanded by Captain William H. Mattingly, of Company G, (6th) marched out of Weston and occupied "Fort Bulltown." The detachment comprised seven officers and one hundred seventeen men. Lumber was brought down from Falls Mill and several more ''huts" erected. Nothing of importance happened until September 30th, when Enos B. Cooper, of Company I, was killed in a distressing accident.

The month of October opened with little activity. Now and then a Confederate scout was reported along the road. About the 10th, some one started here and there to destroy the telegraph line than ran from Weston to Sutton. George Ross, in his little office near the Second Street Bridge in Weston, had frequent interruptions to the service. On the morning of the 12th, a detail from Company G under Captain H. C. Ransom, rode out of Weston to make repairs. They worked as far south as Jacksonville and checked stations at Crowells, Conrads (now Roanoke) and at other places. Trouble still continued. In the meantime, however, Colonel William L. Jackson had set out from the Greenbrier Valley in an effort to capture Bulltown and cut Federal communications with the Kanawha Valley. It was a dangerous undertaking, through an almost impassable wilderness. He followed the "Cold Knob Trail" to the upper waters of the Elk and then crossed by the way of Holly River to the Little Kanawha. He had in his command seven hundred infantry, seventy-five cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. It is difficult to define his regular organization. The nearest report available shows that he had the Nineteenth Cavalry, under Lt. Col. W. P. Thompson; the Twentieth Virginia Cavalry, or part of it, under Col. W. W. Arnett; a detachment of six companies of infantry; and the Virginia Battery, under Captain Warren S. Lurty, of Clarksburg. This battery was composed of two twelve-pound howitzers. Prominent among the captains were George Downs, J. W. Marshall and John S. Sprigg, all of the Nineteenth. It is not clear that all of this organization participated in the affair at Bulltown, but the expedition was drawn from these groups. The artillery is generally understood to have been smaller or at least small enough to be dismounted and carried on mules.

Reaching the Little Kanawha at Falls Mills on the evening of the 12th, Colonel Jackson planned to divide his command in two detachments and converge upon the Federal fortifications at daybreak. They knew the Federals had no artillery at the time, although a six-pound field piece was sent out from Weston a few days later. Major J. M. Kessler was placed in command of the north wing and was to march across the narrow neck of land to Millstone Run and attack from the northeast. Jackson and W. P. Thompson were to come in from the southwest and take up a position on the opposite side of the river. Both were then to charge with the firing of the first shell from the "Jackass" battery, as it was called, from the fact that the guns were carried in on mules. The plans, for some reason, miscarried. Kessler arrived first and did not wait for Jackson. He proceeded about 4:30 A. M., reported Mattingly, "to charge our fortifications on the northeast side." We fell back to our main fortifications. They pursued us until within a few yards of our fortifications when we poured it into them strong and repulsed them successfully. When Jackson finally did arrive, he took up a position on the elevation on the opposite side of the river, which he held throughout the engagement. At 8:00 A. M. from "Headquarters within our entrenchments" he sent a note to Mattingly in which he set forth that "my forces have now entirely surrounded you, is very largely superior to yours and it is useless for you to contend." Mattingly records that he replied to Jackson "to come and take us."

The engagement continued with neither side gaining any advantage but the Federals held the fort. In one of the log huts was a small pet bear and a detachment of Confederates made a determined effort to capture this particular part of the post. Captain John Sprigg, of the Confederates, mounted on a handsome white horse rode out in the main road. This drew forth a shower of shots, few of which had any effect. Late in the afternoon, a musket ball struck Captain Mattingly in the leg, breaking the thigh bone. Command then fell to Captain (Major) James L. Simpson of Company C, Eleventh Infantry. About three o'clock a flag of truce disclosed another command to surrender, which was again refused and the engagement continued. Mattingly wired Weston and Clarksburg "to send reinforcements and ammunition" and "send by all possible dispatch a surgeon; send best you can." He further reported that the Federals had sent back to the Confederate lines "nine of their killed," partly an error, "and had also captured one lieutenant and one private." The engagement continued until about 4:30 P. M. The firing of the artillery was heard plainly as far as Jacksonville, a distance of eight miles. Late in the evening Jackson and his command retreated south, and encamped for the night at Salt Lick Bridge, five miles distant. At the same time, just about dark, folks gathered at the junction of the road in Jacksonville and watched Major C. F. Howes with a battalion of the Fourth (W) Virginia Cavalry ride out the "pike" on his way to the relief of the garrison. On the morning of the 14th, this detachment pursued the Confederates and met them at Salt Lick Bridge. The Confederates took position behind a stone wall and a short skirmish took place. Additional forces from Buckhannon under Major Gibson of Averells' command now arrived and the Confederates in some confusion retreated. A battalion of the Second (W) Virginia Volunteer Mounted Infantry was sent toward Addison, now Webster Springs, but did not catch up with Jackson's command. On the 15th, General B. F. Kelley, at Clarksburg, wired General Ephraim Scammon, at Charleston, that Jackson was retreating up "Bryants Fork of the Little Kanawha" and had lost "thirteen killed and sixty wounded," in the attack on Bulltown, which was an exaggeration. "Our loss," he reported, "was trifling. Our men were covered by breastworks."

The request for a surgeon reached Weston late at night. Dr. E. D. Stafford, the post surgeon of the Sixth Infantry had gone to Clarksburg. Dr. Thomas Bland Camden, accompanied by Frank Chalfant, a druggist at Weston, set out on horseback for Bulltown, arriving just before noon on the 14th. The firing at Salt Lick Bridge could still be heard. From Dr. Camden's report we find that no one was killed on the Federal side, but John McGilton was reported as "missing in action." William D. Wells, Company A, Sixth Infantry; S. Trowbridge, Company I, a boy of eighteen; S. V. Ayers, Laban J. Bennett, and S. S. Stalnaker, of the Eleventh Regiment were made prisoners. Captain Mattingly's wound did not prove as serious as at first reported. The ball was removed from his leg, but it left him lame the remainder of his life. In later years he became Sheriff of Wood County. Lieutenant J. Holt was shot in one shoulder but recovered.

On the Confederate side, seven men were killed. "Ben Schoonova from the Sand Fork of the Little Kanawha," reported Dr. Camden, "was shot from near a half mile, the femoral artery was cut and he bled to death, but could have been saved had the services of a surgeon been available." All of the dead were buried on the battlefield. In 1889, some kind-hearted person had the bodies removed to a farm on the west side of the river where they were buried in one grave, and a cut stone wall placed about it.

Six or more Confederates were wounded. Allen J. Wells, a private, who was wounded early in the action died during the retreat and was buried on Big Run three miles from Bulltown. John Sumpter had a leg broken and was cared for at the home of Moses Cunningham, on whose farm most of the battle took place. The Cunningham home, a large log house, is still standing and is occupied by members of this family. It bears many scars, and more than one bullet hole show evidence of the struggle.

Moses Cunningham who then lived in it was an unusual character. Dr. Camden records that he ran out and "hurrahed for Jeff Davis and a soldier shot him in the back. I dressed his wound; he recovered and became more careful in his cheering." Others assert that the Federals made him prisoner, marched him up along the hillside and then notified him that he was to be shot. He said he wished to make a statement and the desire was granted. In a loud voice, which could be heard above the intermittent firing he called out, "Hark the tomb, a doleful sound, my ears attend the cries; Ye living men come view the ground where you d: Yankees must shortly lie."

Lieutenant William Norris, badly wounded, was cared for at the home of John Lorentz, who lived at the south end of the bridge. William Benson, with a shattered leg, was taken to the home of P. B. Berry. Others whose names are unknown were taken to the home of Colonel Addison McLaughlin at the salt works. Practically all of the wounded men were later taken to Weston as prisoners of war. A great deal of local tradition has been handed down about this battle. Many romantic stories are told of a Confederate, mounted on a white horse, who rode out, cheered the men on, and then disappeared. It is also said that Jackson's command ran into a distillery before they arrived at Bull- town. Further, that at one time the Federals actually surrendered, but the Confederates did not know it.

After it became evident that Jackson and his command had escaped to the waters of the Greenbrier, Major Howes and his battalion marched back to the post at Weston. As they passed down the main street the men were singing a song composed by one of the group, and it ended with a humorous chorus:

"Jackson he was drinking, and Thompson was drinking too,
And Kessler was not sober, so the Yankees put them through."

Such was the attitude of the men in the Federal ranks that came through the "battle" without injury. It is true, of course, that this view might have been prompted by jealousy in connection with the alleged refreshments. It is only fair, however, to state that this part of the story is subject to some revision. The Federals called Jackson, General "Mudwall," to distinguish him from his brilliant cousin, "Stonewall" Jackson. Jackson was a very able man and soldier. He was born at Clarksburg, but at the outbreak of the war he was living in Parkersburg. He served as Circuit Judge and Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. His services in the army led to a. commission as brigadier general. After the war he sold his home in Parkersburg to Dr. Camden, the attending surgeon at Bulltown, and removed to Louisville, Kentucky, where he achieved distinction as a jurist. Thompson was from Wheeling but at the outbreak of the war was a young lawyer of Fairmont. He organized the "Marion Greys" which became part of the 31st Virginia Infantry. During the war he rose to the rank of colonel and subsequently became vice president of the Standard Oil Company and head of the National Lead Company. Arnett became a well known lawyer of Wheeling. Others served in various ways their state and the nation. It was no unusual thing in later years, in the city of Parkersburg to see several of the one time "enemies" gathered in a group reciting the experiences on the battlefields from Bulltown to Gettysburg and Appomattox.

The "Battle of Bulltown," was a a small affair measured by the standards applied to Antietam or Vicksburg, but it was an important engagement in the military annals of West Virginia. Had the Confederates succeeded in cutting the line of communication between the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the Great Kanawha Valley, the history of the war in West Virginia might have undergone several changes. The "front" would have been pushed back to Glenville which was the next river crossing of importance that boasted of a road. Today the visitor finds little to remind him of the October days of 1863. But one can wander through the old entrenchments, covered with undergrowth and fancy still the shrill shriek of round shot from the artillery and the whistle of "minie" balls. All around are now evidence of peace. The motorist that goes swiftly by knows little of the communion of spirits of the Blue and Gray that gather when the shadows of the evening fall along the waters of the Little Kanawha.

1880 United States Federal Census for Andrew B. Stonestreet Broxton County, West Virginia

Linton Research Fund Inc., Publication 1987-2023 "Digging for our Roots"